Sunday, 15 January 2017

Capital Celluloid 2017 - Day 36: Sun Feb 5

Lost Highway (Lynch, 1997): Curzon Soho, 3pm


Here's an exciting new venture. A Curzon Soho season labelled 'Enthusiasm' dedicated to monthly 16mm/35mm Sunday afternoon screenings. February's event is entitled 'Hollywood Babylon'.

Here is the cinema's introduction:
This second instalment of ENTHUSIASM, our bold new series of repertory screenings dedicated to showing film on film, is a rare chance to see two films from the dark side of Hollywood, in their original, analogue formats. In Rabbit’s Moon, playing here on 16mm in its original 1950 version, Kenneth Anger’s sweetly subversive Pierrot causes chaos with a magic lantern in a tinselled wood. Lost for many years after Anger was chased off the set of the French films studio when they learnt of what he was doing, Rabbit’s Moon remains one of the most haunting and playful films about black magic ever omitted to celluloid. Our main feature is David Lynch’s surreal 1997 horror Lost Highway – a blistering psychogenic–fugue narrative that sees mysterious videotapes, classic cars, Kafkaesque metamorphoses and Marilyn Manson in a graphic porno film admist the seedy underbelly of a noir–infused Los Angeles. A fuller introduction can be found here.


Chicago Reader review of Lost Highway:
It's questionable how much Barry Gifford has benefited the work of David Lynch—either in furnishing the source material for Wild at Heart or in collaborating on this even more noir-heavy script—but this 1996 feature was Lynch's most audacious break from conventional narrative since Eraserhead. The enigmatic plot, shaped like a Möbius strip, concerns a jazz musician (Bill Pullman) who inexplicably changes into a much younger garage mechanic (Balthazar Getty) after possibly killing his wife (Patricia Arquette). The wife seems to have been reincarnated as a gangster's girlfriend (Arquette again), who pursues the mechanic. Despite the shopworn noir imagery and teenage notions of sex, this beautifully structured (if rigorously nonhumanist) explosion of expressionist effects has a psychological coherence that goes well beyond logical story lines, and Lynch turns it into an exhilarating roller-coaster ride. With Robert Blake (as Arquette's eerie doppelganger), Gary Busey, Lucy Butler, Robert Loggia, Jack Nance, and Richard Pryor in a somewhat out-of-kilter cameo.

Jonathan Rosenbaum


This second instalment of ENTHUSIASM, our bold new series of repertory screenings dedicated to showing film on film, is a rare chance to see two films from the dark side of Hollywood, in their original, analogue formats. Child–actor–turned–pioneering underground gay filmmaker and author of the scandalous poison pen letter Hollywood Babylon, Kenneth Anger is a monument of independent cinema, whose impact on the art form cannot be overstated. The mythology that has grown around him has many sources, from his involvement with Satanism, the occult, astrology and the pop world of Mick Jagger, Marianne Faithfull and Jimmy Page, to the announcement of his own death in the pages of the Village Voice, and the destruction, loss and banning of his films amidst a slew of obscenity charges. At the heart of all this controversy is a filmmaker of prodigious talent, whose skill and imagination create films of great visual force, influencing artists such as Martin Scorsese, David Lynch and Rainer Werner Fassbinder. In Rabbit’s Moon, playing here on 16mm in its original 1950 version, Anger’s sweetly subversive Pierrot causes chaos with a magic lantern in a tinselled wood. Lost for many years after Anger was chased off the set of the French films studio when they learnt of what he was doing, Rabbit’s Moon remains one of the most haunting and playful films about black magic ever omitted to celluloid. Our main feature is David Lynch’s surreal 1997 horror Lost Highway – a blistering psychogenic–fugue narrative that sees mysterious videotapes, classic cars, Kaftka-esque metamorphoses and Marilyn Manson in a graphic porno film admist the seedy underbelly of a noir–infused Los Angeles. - See more at: http://www.curzoncinemas.com/soho/film-info/_enthusiasm-lost-highway-rabbits-moon#sthash.FYwm7WSY.dpuf
This second instalment of ENTHUSIASM, our bold new series of repertory screenings dedicated to showing film on film, is a rare chance to see two films from the dark side of Hollywood, in their original, analogue formats. - See more at: http://www.curzoncinemas.com/soho/film-info/_enthusiasm-lost-highway-rabbits-moon#sthash.FYwm7WSY.dpuf
This second instalment of ENTHUSIASM, our bold new series of repertory screenings dedicated to showing film on film, is a rare chance to see two films from the dark side of Hollywood, in their original, analogue formats. Child–actor–turned–pioneering underground gay filmmaker and author of the scandalous poison pen letter Hollywood Babylon, Kenneth Anger is a monument of independent cinema, whose impact on the art form cannot be overstated. The mythology that has grown around him has many sources, from his involvement with Satanism, the occult, astrology and the pop world of Mick Jagger, Marianne Faithfull and Jimmy Page, to the announcement of his own death in the pages of the Village Voice, and the destruction, loss and banning of his films amidst a slew of obscenity charges. At the heart of all this controversy is a filmmaker of prodigious talent, whose skill and imagination create films of great visual force, influencing artists such as Martin Scorsese, David Lynch and Rainer Werner Fassbinder. In Rabbit’s Moon, playing here on 16mm in its original 1950 version, Anger’s sweetly subversive Pierrot causes chaos with a magic lantern in a tinselled wood. Lost for many years after Anger was chased off the set of the French films studio when they learnt of what he was doing, Rabbit’s Moon remains one of the most haunting and playful films about black magic ever omitted to celluloid. Our main feature is David Lynch’s surreal 1997 horror Lost Highway – a blistering psychogenic–fugue narrative that sees mysterious videotapes, classic cars, Kaftka-esque metamorphoses and Marilyn Manson in a graphic porno film admist the seedy underbelly of a noir–infused Los Angeles. - See more at: http://www.curzoncinemas.com/soho/film-info/_enthusiasm-lost-highway-rabbits-moon#sthash.FYwm7WSY.dpuf
d instalment of ENTHUSIASM, our bold new series of repertory screenings dedicated to showing film on film, is a rare chance to see two films from the dark side of Hollywood, in their original, analogue formats. Child–actor–turned–pioneering underground gay filmmaker and author of the scandalous poison pen letter Hollywood Babylon, Kenneth Anger is a monument of independent cinema, whose impact on the art form cannot be overstated. The mythology that has grown around him has many sources, from his involvement with Satanism, the occult, astrology and the pop world of Mick Jagger, Marianne Faithfull and Jimmy Page, to the announcement of his own death in the pages of the Village Voice, and the destruction, loss and banning of his films amidst a slew of obscenity charges. At the heart of all this controversy is a filmmaker of prodigious talent, whose skill and imagination create films of great visual force, influencing artists such as Martin Scorsese, David Lynch and Rainer Werner Fassbinder. In Rabbit’s Moon, playing here on 16mm in its original 1950 version, Anger’s sweetly subversive Pierrot causes chaos with a magic lantern in a tinselled wood. Lost for many years after Anger was chased off the set of the French films studio when they learnt of what he was doing, Rabbit’s Moon remains one of the most haunting and playful films about black magic ever omitted to celluloid. Our main feature is David Lynch’s surreal 1997 horror Lost Highway – a blistering psychogenic–fugue narrative that sees mysterious videotapes, classic cars, Kaftka-esque metamorphoses and Marilyn Manson in a graphic porno film admist the seedy underbelly of a noir–infused Los Angeles. - See more at: http://www.curzoncinemas.com/soho/film-info/_enthusiasm-lost-highway-rabbits-moon#sthash.FYwm7WSY.dpuf
This second instalment of ENTHUSIASM, our bold new series of repertory screenings dedicated to showing film on film, is a rare chance to see two films from the dark side of Hollywood, in their original, analogue formats. Child–actor–turned–pioneering underground gay filmmaker and author of the scandalous poison pen letter Hollywood Babylon, Kenneth Anger is a monument of independent cinema, whose impact on the art form cannot be overstated. The mythology that has grown around him has many sources, from his involvement with Satanism, the occult, astrology and the pop world of Mick Jagger, Marianne Faithfull and Jimmy Page, to the announcement of his own death in the pages of the Village Voice, and the destruction, loss and banning of his films amidst a slew of obscenity charges. At the heart of all this controversy is a filmmaker of prodigious talent, whose skill and imagination create films of great visual force, influencing artists such as Martin Scorsese, David Lynch and Rainer Werner Fassbinder. In Rabbit’s Moon, playing here on 16mm in its original 1950 version, Anger’s sweetly subversive Pierrot causes chaos with a magic lantern in a tinselled wood. Lost for many years after Anger was chased off the set of the French films studio when they learnt of what he was doing, Rabbit’s Moon remains one of the most haunting and playful films about black magic ever omitted to celluloid. Our main feature is David Lynch’s surreal 1997 horror Lost Highway – a blistering psychogenic–fugue narrative that sees mysterious videotapes, classic cars, Kaftka-esque metamorphoses and Marilyn Manson in a graphic porno film admist the seedy underbelly of a noir–infused Los Angeles. - See more at: http://www.curzoncinemas.com/soho/film-info/_enthusiasm-lost-highway-rabbits-moon#sthash.FYwm7WSY.dpuf

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