Saturday, 23 September 2017

Capital Celluloid 2017 - Day 285: Sun Oct 15

Funeral Parade of Roses (Matsumoto, 1969): Haymarket Cinema, 8.30pm


61st LONDON FILM FESTIVAL (4th-15th October 2017) DAY 11

Every day (from October 4th to October 15th) I will be selecting the London Film Festival choices you have a chance to get tickets for and the movies you are unlikely to see in London very soon unless you go to see them at the Festival. Here is the LFF's main website for the general information you need. Don't worry if some of the recommended films are sold out by the time you read this as there are always some tickets on offer which go on sale 30 minutes before each screening. Here is all the information you need about the best way to get tickets.

'Funeral Parade of Roses' also screens at ICA Cinema on October 13th. Details here.

Time Out review:
Like Nagisa Oshima's contemporary Diary of a Shinjuku Thief, this still extraordinary film was a response to the 1968 student riots. But Toshio Matsumoto goes further than Oshima - into Shinjuku 2-chome, Tokyo's gay ghetto, to enact a queer revamp of the Oedipus myth. Popular young trannie Eddie (Peter, later the Fool in Ran) throws himself into affairs with a black GI and a Japanese hippie to drown out his memories of killing his mother when he caught her inflagrante with a stranger. Then he shacks up with Gonda, manager of the gay bar Genet, only to find out that the man is his long-lost father. Matsumoto splinters the story's time-frame, splashes captions across the frame and cuts in bits of ciné vérité and interviews with the cast - making it one of the most formally advanced films of the psychedelic decade.

Tony Rayns

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Capital Celluloid 2017 - Day 284: Sat Oct 14

Scarface (Hawks, 1932):  BFI Southbank, NFT1, 6.20pm



61st LONDON FILM FESTIVAL (4th-15th October 2017) DAY 10

Every day (from October 4th to October 15th) I will be selecting the London Film Festival choices you have a chance to get tickets for and the movies you are unlikely to see in London very soon unless you go to see them at the Festival. Here is the LFF's main website for the general information you need. Don't worry if some of the recommended films are sold out by the time you read this as there are always some tickets on offer which go on sale 30 minutes before each screening. Here is all the information you need about the best way to get tickets.

'Scarface' also screens at Cine Lumiere on October 16th. Details here.

Chicago Reader review:
Howard Hawks's 1932 masterpiece is a dark, brutal, exhilaratingly violent film, blending comedy and horror in a manner that suggests Chico Marx let loose with a live machine gun. Paul Muni gives his best performance as the simian hood Tony Camonte, whose one redeeming virtue is that he loves his sister (Ann Dvorak, of the limpid eyes and jutting limbs). Hawks reverses the usual structure of the gangster tragedy: Camonte doesn't hubristically challenge his world so much as go with the flow of its natural chaos and violence. The supporting actors—Osgood Perkins, Karen Morely, Boris Karloff, Vince Barnett, George Raft (flipping his coin)—seem to have been chosen for their geometric qualities; the film is a symphony of body shapes and gestures, functioning dynamically as well as dramatically.
Dave Kehr

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Capital Celluloid 2017 - Day 283: Fri Oct 13

Faces, Places (Varda, 2017): BFI Southbank, NFT1, 3.20pm


61st LONDON FILM FESTIVAL (4th-15th October 2017) DAY 9

Every day (from October 4th to October 15th) I will be selecting the London Film Festival choices you have a chance to get tickets for and the movies you are unlikely to see in London very soon unless you go to see them at the Festival. Here is the LFF's main website for the general information you need. Don't worry if some of the recommended films are sold out by the time you read this as there are always some tickets on offer which go on sale 30 minutes before each screening. Here is all the information you need about the best way to get tickets.

'Faces Places' also screens at Curzon Mayfair on October 12th. Details here.

London Film Festival preview:
Arriving in town in a van that doubles up as a giant camera, Agnès Varda and JR make quite an impression. For all the initial odd-couple thrills of seeing the revered French filmmaker rolling her eyes at the younger artist’s exuberance, a deep connection is quickly forged between two creative souls, who are fuelled by the desire to see their imaginations realised on a grand scale. Photographing people at home or work and pasting the huge images in public spaces, the pair use this art practice as a pretext to listen to working class French people reflect upon their lives. Deceptively simple in structure, the film’s socialist feminist politics are expertly folded into a moving humanism, exemplified in a moment where JR recreates the world as viewed through Varda’s blurring vision. And the film’s final act? A pilgrimage to visit old friend and notorious recluse – Jean-Luc Godard.

Kate Taylor
 

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Friday, 22 September 2017

Capital Celluloid 2017 - Day 282: Thu Oct 12

A Matter of Life and Death (Powell/Pressburger): BFI Southbank, NFT1, 6.10pm


61st LONDON FILM FESTIVAL (4th-15th October 2017) DAY 8

Every day (from October 4th to October 15th) I will be selecting the London Film Festival choices you have a chance to get tickets for and the movies you are unlikely to see in London very soon unless you go to see them at the Festival. Here is the LFF's main website for the general information you need. Don't worry if some of the recommended films are sold out by the time you read this as there are always some tickets on offer which go on sale 30 minutes before each screening. Here is all the information you need about the best way to get tickets.

'A Matter of Life and Death' also screens on October 15th at BFI Southbank. Details here.

Chicago Reader review:
This enduring 1946 Technicolor fantasy by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger began as a propaganda piece meant to cement wobbly British-American postwar relations, and some of that theme survives, notably in the climactic trial scene set in heaven. But the rest is given over to a delirious romanticism, tinged with morbidity, mysticism, and humor. David Niven is the British fighter pilot who misses his appointment with death, falling in love with a Wac (Kim Hunter) on his borrowed time. Powell had more and bigger ideas than any other postwar British director: his use of color and bold graphic images is startling and exhilarating, as is his willingness to explore the subsidiary themes of Pressburger's screenplay, never sacrificing creative excitement to linear plot. And yet, for all its abstraction, the film remains emotionally specific and affecting. With Roger Livesey and Marius Goring.
Dave Kehr


Here (and above) is the opening to the film.

Capital Celluloid 2017 - Day 281: Wed Oct 11

Salesman (Albert & David Maysles, 1968): BFI Southbank, NFT2, 8.45pm


61st LONDON FILM FESTIVAL (4th-15th October 2017) DAY 7

Every day (from October 4th to October 15th) I will be selecting the London Film Festival choices you have a chance to get tickets for and the movies you are unlikely to see in London very soon unless you go to see them at the Festival. Here is the LFF's main website for the general information you need. Don't worry if some of the recommended films are sold out by the time you read this as there are always some tickets on offer which go on sale 30 minutes before each screening. Here is all the information you need about the best way to get tickets.

'Salesman' also screens on October 8th at Curzon Mayfair and October 14th at UCA Cinema. Details here.

Chicago Reader review:
Albert and David Maysles's documentary films are like no one else's, combining intelligence, an incredible sensitivity for character and nuance, and a technical facility that creates a subtle and compelling mood. This 1968 study of door-to-door Bible salesmen in the Boston area and in the south is a superb and truthful look at an American institution—and at the troubling relationship between fact and fiction, materialism and spiritual values. Beautifully edited by Charlotte Zwerin, this film is required viewing for anyone concerned with documentary.
Don Druker


Here (and above) is the trailer.

Thursday, 21 September 2017

Capital Celluloid 2017 - Day 280: Tue Oct 10

120 BPM (Campillo, 2017): Embankment Garden Cinema, 5.15pm


61st LONDON FILM FESTIVAL (4th-15th October 2017) DAY 7

Every day (from October 4th to October 15th) I will be selecting the London Film Festival choices you have a chance to get tickets for and the movies you are unlikely to see in London very soon unless you go to see them at the Festival. Here is the LFF's main website for the general information you need. Don't worry if some of the recommended films are sold out by the time you read this as there are always some tickets on offer which go on sale 30 minutes before each screening. Here is all the information you need about the best way to get tickets.

'120 BPM' also screens on October 7th at Embankment Garden Cinema. Details here.

London Film Festival preview:
Pulsating with life and pounding with urgency, this rousing, heart-breaking celebration of political activism is nothing short of a modern queer classic. Drawing directly on personal experience, Robin Campillo’s extraordinary account of AIDS activist group ACT UP-Paris in the 1990s begins in the thick of it – at a group meeting. As members discuss action and debate strategy, a small gang of fresh recruits are welcomed into the fold. Among the newbies is introspective, HIV-negative Nathan, who finds himself instantly drawn to outspoken group member Sean. As Nathan becomes more involved in the group’s activities – from closed-off meetings to direct action in medical labs, school playgrounds and political rallies – his romantic relationship with Sean develops. With much of the drama taking place in the meeting space, Campillo’s film thrives on the power of discourse. So rarely has the palpable exhilaration and frustration of activism been so richly rendered on screen, with the weekly gatherings that punctuate the film exuding passion and anger. But far more than a cerebral account of political action, this is a deeply emotional and bracingly sensual film, which ignites the heart and body just as much as it incites the mind.
Michael Blyth

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Wednesday, 20 September 2017

Capital Celluloid 2017 - Day 279: Mon Oct 9

Jeune Femme (Serraille, 2017): Vue Leicester Square, 12.30pm



61st LONDON FILM FESTIVAL (4th-15th October 2017) DAY 6

Every day (from October 4th to October 15th) I will be selecting the London Film Festival choices you have a chance to get tickets for and the movies you are unlikely to see in London very soon unless you go to see them at the Festival. Here is the LFF's main website for the general information you need. Don't worry if some of the recommended films are sold out by the time you read this as there are always some tickets on offer which go on sale 30 minutes before each screening. Here is all the information you need about the best way to get tickets.

'Jeune Femme' also screens on October 8th at Curzon Mayfair and October 15th at Curzon Soho. Details here.

London Film Festival preview:
When a key doesn’t get Paula into her ex-lover’s apartment, her attempts at head-butting the door open also prove unsuccessful. A bleeding head wound opens this kinetic, urgent portrait of a heartbroken young woman who is her own worst enemy. Hauling the ex’s cat across Paris in a cardboard box, Paula’s days as a photographer’s muse are over. But she does possess a scrappy charisma and this magnetism is her ticket to clawing her way back to stability. Jeune Femme takes its cues from Laetitia Dosch’s impossible-to-take-your-eyes-off-her performance as Paula, hurtling through scenes to a post-punk electro score. Debut director Léonor Serraille impresses with sheer vivacity – this is filmmaking from someone who is alive to both the possibilities of cinema and to human experience in 2017. And it’s a film that is funny, moving and hugely invigorating.
Kate Taylor

Here (and above) is the trailer.