Monday, 15 January 2018

Capital Celluloid 2018 - Day 27: Sat Jan 27

The Trial (Welles, 1962): Close Up Cinema, 7.30pm


This screening is part of the Orson Welles season at Close-Up Cinema from January 15th to 30th. You can find all the details here.

Chicago Reader review:
Though debatable as an adaptation of the Franz Kafka novel, Orson Welles's nightmarish, labyrinthine comedy of 1962—shot mainly in Paris's abandoned Gare d'Orsay and various locations in Zagreb and Rome after he had to abandon his plan to use sets—remains his creepiest and most disturbing work; it's also a lot more influential than people usually admit (e.g., 
After Hours, the costume store sequences in Eyes Wide Shut). Anthony Perkins gives an adolescent temper to Joseph K, a bureaucrat mysteriously brought to court for an unspecified crime. Among the predatory females who pursue him are Jeanne Moreau, Romy Schneider, and Elsa Martinelli; Welles himself plays the hero's tyrannical lawyer, and Akim Tamiroff is one of his oldest clients. Welles adroitly captures the experience of an unsettling and slightly hysterical dream throughout. Given the impact of screen size on what he's doing, you can't claim to have seen this if you've watched it only on video.
Jonathan Rosenbaum


Here (and above) is the trailer.

Sunday, 14 January 2018

Capital Celluloid 2018 - Day 26: Fri Jan 26

Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941): Close-Up Cinema, 7.30pm


This screening is part of the Orson Welles season at Close-Up Cinema from January 15th to 30th. ou can find all the details here.

Chicago Reader review: 
'What can you say about the movie that taught you what movies were? The first time I saw Kane I discovered the existence of the director; the next dozen or so times taught me what he did—with lights and camera angles, cutting and composition, texture and rhythm. Kane (1941) is no longer my favorite Orson Welles film (I'd take Ambersons, Falstaff, or Touch of Evil), but it is still the best place I know of to start thinking about Welles—or for that matter about movies in general.'   

Dave Kehr

Here (and above) is the trailer. 

Capital Celluloid 2018 - Day 25: Thu Jan 25

Touch of Evil (Welles, 1959): Close-Up Cinema, 7.30pm


This screening is part of the Orson Welles season at Close-Up Cinema from January 15th to 30th, and is also being shown on January 20th. You can find all the details here.

Chicago Reader review:
Eternal damnation to the wretch at Universal who printed the opening titles over the most brilliant establishing shot in film history—a shot that establishes not only place and main characters in its continuous movement over several city blocks, but also the film's theme (crossing boundaries), spatial metaphors, and peculiar bolero rhythm. Made in 1958, it was Orson Welles's last Hollywood film, and in it he makes transcendent use of the American technology his genius throve on; never again would his resources be so rich or his imagination so fiendishly baroque. Welles stars as the sheriff of a corrupt border town who finds his nemesis in visiting Mexican narcotics agent Charlton Heston; the witnesses to this weirdly gargantuan struggle include Janet Leigh, Marlene Dietrich, Akim Tamiroff, and Joseph Calleia, who holds the film's moral center with sublime uncertainty.

Dave Kehr

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Friday, 12 January 2018

Capital Celluloid 2018 - Day 24: Wed Jan 24

Othello (Welles, 1952): Close-Up Cinema, 7.30pm


This screening is part of the Orson Welles season at Close-Up Cinema from January 15th to 30th. You can find all the details here.

Chicago Reader review:
For all the liberties taken with the play, Orson Welles's 1952 independent feature may well be the greatest Shakespeare film (Welles's later 
Chimes at Midnight is the only other contender)—a brooding expressionist dream made in eerie Moorish locations over nearly three years, yet held together by a remarkably cohesive style and atmosphere. (The film looks better than ever in its 1992 restored version, though it sounds quite different thanks to the restorers' debatable decision to redo the brilliant score and sound effects in stereo, altering them considerably in the process.) The most impressive performance here is Micheal MacLiammoir's Iago; Welles's own underplaying of the title role meshes well with the somnambulistic mood, but apart from some magnificent line readings he makes less of a dramatic impression.
Jonathan Rosenbaum


Here (and above) is the trailer.

Thursday, 11 January 2018

Capital Celluloid 2018 - Day 23: Tue Jan 23

Through A Glass Darkly (Bergman, 1961): BFI Southbank, NFT3, 6.10pm


This film, which is also screened on January 29th, is part of the Ingmar Bergman season at BFI Southbank. Full details here.

Chicago Reader review:
The first part of Ingmar Bergman's trilogy (with Winter Light and The Silence), elaborating his search for a new interpretation of “God” apart from the conventional one on which he was raised. Elaborately rhetorical at the end, this 1961 film nevertheless develops its theme lucidly and with some of Bergman's most unforgettable sequences, such as the slow descent of the helicopter as Harriet Andersson screams “God is a spider!”
Don Druker


Here (and above) is the trailer.

Wednesday, 10 January 2018

Capital Celluloid 2018 - Day 22: Mon Jan 22

There Will Be Blood (Anderson, 2007): Picturehouse Central, 6.30pm


This film, part of the 35mm screenings season for Paul Thomas Anderson films ahead of the release of his new film Phantom Thread, is also being screened from the 35mm print at the Prince Charles Cinema on January 28th. Full details here.

Picturehouse Cinema introduction:
A sprawling epic about family, faith, power and oil, There Will Be Blood is set on the incendiary frontier of California’s turn-of-the-century petroleum boom. The story chronicles the life and times of one Daniel Plainview (Daniel Day-Lewis), who transforms himself from a down-and-out silver miner raising a son on his own into a self-made oil tycoon. He takes a chance when he hears of a little town out West where an ocean of oil is oozing out of the ground, and makes his lucky strike. But as the well raises his and the town’s fortunes, nothing will remain the same; conflicts escalate and every human value – love, hope, community, belief, ambition and even the bond between father and son – is imperilled by corruption, deception and the flow of oil.

Here (and above) is the trailer. 

Tuesday, 9 January 2018

Capital Celluloid 2018 - Day 21: Sun Jan 21

Punch-Drunk Love (Anderson, 2002): Prince Charles Cinema, 6.30pm


This film is part of the 'Paul Thomas Anderson 35mm tour' and you can read the full details of the season at the Prince Charles Cinema here.

Time Out review:Remember that brief, golden period in the early 2000s when you could openly admit to your friends and family that you were looking forward to the new Adam Sandler movie? A time before ‘Grown Ups 2’ and ‘Blended’, when this still-promising comedy talent actually took risks with his career? It’s impossible to imagine the Sandler of today agreeing to ‘Punch-Drunk Love’ – then again, it’s pretty hard to imagine that he knew what he was getting himself into. Paul Thomas Anderson’s film is without doubt the oddest romcom of all time, suspended in a hinterland between old-fashioned screwball antics, quirky indie romance and outright arthouse obliqueness. The tone is impossible to pin down, veering from rage to romance to ice-cold stillness. But somehow it works: the glassy LA photography is eye-ravishingly cool, the performances are just this side of too-far-out, and the love affair between Sandler and Emily Watson is simply, truly perfect.
Tom Huddleston

Here (and above) is the trailer.